Our Mission

CardioChoices was developed to educate heart patients on heart problems such as: heart disease, heart attacks, heart failure, atrial fibrillation and arrhythmias. We utilize customized videos of cardiovascular conditions and procedures to facilitate learning so patients can have open discussions with their cardiologists regarding heart disease.

Read more about us

Our Mission

CardioChoices was developed to educate heart patients on heart problems such as: heart disease, heart attacks, heart failure, atrial fibrillation and arrhythmias. We utilize customized videos of cardiovascular conditions and procedures to facilitate learning so patients can have open discussions with their cardiologists regarding heart disease.

Read more about us



Heart Health This Summer

Summer time is here again.  The weather is hot and baseball, golf and tennis seasons are in full swing. You may be more active in the next few months, and it's important to remember that overexertion during summer time activities can be dangerous for people who had a previous heart attack.  You may be at risk for another heart attack.


Sudden, strenuous activity may tax the heart muscle.  If you have suffered a heart attack, summer months mean that you have to protect yourself.  As you join the millions of Americans outdoors mowing the lawn, splashing in the water or bicycling, you must remember to listen to your body.  Moderate physical activity and awareness of your physical limitations are key to good heart health during the summer.


While being active is important and has many benefits, overdoing it may increase the risk of another heart attack.  These activities combined with extreme temperatures and air pollution may trigger a heart attack in people who have already had one.  Each year over one million people in the United States will experience a heart attack. Also, within six years of having a first heart attack, a second heart attack occurs in approximately one in five men and one in three women.


Having a heart attack also increases the risk of having a stroke. Risk factors for heart attack include: high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, smoking, lack of physical activity, obesity, diabetes, and a family history of heart disease. So what can you do if you are at risk? Things to remember include: stay hydrated, exercise in moderation, avoid overexertion, refrain from smoking and eat a heart healthy diet. Also, take all of the medications that have been prescribed by your cardiologist.

 

 

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